Daniel called us a few months ago about his late uncle’s Clairemont home, which he had just inherited. His uncle had owned the house for over 40 years. It was completely paid off and in a beautiful location, surrounded by the mesas, streams, and canyons that make Clairemont one of the most desirable communities in San Diego. The catch? His uncle had been a chronic hoarder.

I toured the home with Daniel the next day and I can only honestly tell you it was one of the most vile places I’ve ever seen. Trash was stockpiled, vermin ran freely, and termites had invaded. Daniel was overwhelmed. He knew he could never sell it on the real estate market the way it was, and just looking at it burned a hole in his pocket. The relief on his face when we bought the home from him for cash is something I’ll never forget.

I’m telling you about Daniel because I know there are other people out there in the same situation: They’ve inherited a house that belonged to a hoarder and they have no idea where to start. If you’ve found yourself in this same tight spot, we hope you’ll let us help you with the process.

Cleaning Up Will Cost You

Preparing a home to go on the real estate market is hard enough. Now imagine preparing one that used to be owned by a hoarder.

The first thing is the cleanup. Depending on how bad the hoarding was and the size of the house, the cost to clear the house of all the trash can range anywhere from $5,000 to $20,000 – and possibly even beyond.

Once the home is free of trash, you have to deal with the mold, mildew, and toxins that were left behind. If the problem is mild, removal could cost as little as $500 – but it could also cost $10,000 or more. It’s impossible to tell until you see just how extensive the mold is, but be prepared to fork over a lot of cash. Rats and other vermin can also leave behind hazardous waste that needs to be cleaned and disposed of, so you can imagine just how expensive this part gets.

In the end, you can probably count on gutting the entire house of the old studs, flooring, carpet, drywall, and paint so you can replace them with new materials. There is likely no inch of the house that will not have been affected by the hoarding.

The Real Estate Market Is Not Your Friend

Now, let’s just pretend you spent all that money to get your inherited house ready to go on the market. You’ve heard there’s a lot of money to be made, your house is sure to be snatched up by an eager buyer, and you’ll close the deal tomorrow. But here’s something your agent probably hasn’t mentioned:

Neighbors talk. Especially in a small pocket like Clairemont, which is only 13.3 square miles around. Word has already gotten out nearby in Mira Mesa about hoarders and the destructive impact they can have on a neighborhood.

Deals can fall apart if neighbors tell potential buyers what condition a house used to be in. 9 times out of 10, it scares them away. If you think this seems extreme, just put yourself in their shoes. If you were thinking about buying a home and the guy across the street told you that a hoarder lived there and it was once stacked with trash and infested with rats, cockroaches, and mold, would you want to live there? Probably not – especially when there’s another house selling for the same price right around the corner.

Now you’re out all of that money and no one wants to buy the house.

There’s a Solution

If you’re stuck with a house you can’t sell, give us a call. There’s a reason our company is called Sell Your House Direct. We eliminate the middleman, remove the headache, and put cash in your hands. We’ll buy your house as-is and handle the trash removal, extermination, and renovations, so the only thing you have to worry about is cashing a check. From the moment you call, we get to work figuring out what the property is worth – and we’ll take it in any condition. Daniel got a cash offer 24 hours after we first met and if you give us a call, so can you.

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